Comments Off on An ichthyosaur cementery found in Chile, the aerodynamic ‘Brazuca’ World Cup ball, and Mexico’s huge new aquarium

4 June 2014

An ichthyosaur cementery found in Chile, the aerodynamic ‘Brazuca’ World Cup ball, and Mexico’s huge new aquarium

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Foto: Calcio Streaming via Flickr.

Chile

Paleontologists in southern Chile have discovered an ichthyosaur cemetery with at least 46 complete ichthyosaurs. Ichthyosaurs are marine reptiles that disappeared 99 million years ago. One of the fossils contained two embryos.

Brazil

Studies suggest that the World Cup ‘Brazuca’ ball’s aerodynamics will allow players to pass faster and kick the ball more accurately.

Mexico

Mexico City is set to open a huge aquarium on June 11. The Inbursa aquarium will house more than 200 species including 10,000 specimens like sharks, seahorses, turtles, jellyfish and rays, among others.

Mexican scientists are developing nanoparticles for drug delivery.

Three turtles captured on beaches in Sinaloa, Mexico were released with satellite transmitters that will allow researchers to study the animals. This species nests in Japan and migrate to U.S. shores and Mexico to feed and develop.

Argentina

Argentine scientists have built ‘bioglass’ from renewable low cost materials like calcium, phosphorus and silicon. The researchers hope the bioglass can be used to replace degraded bone and for other procedures.

Colombia

Since palm oil production generates 300 tons of waste a year in Colombia, scientists there are are developing activated carbon from the waste to be used to purify water and air.

Peru

Peru wants to use satellite imagery to evaluate the progress of illegal mining, archaeological sites and indigenous populations.