Comments Off on Argentinosaurus walks, 1.5 million-year-old Antarctic climate data, and scientists find the first poisonous crustaceans.

7 November 2013

Argentinosaurus walks, 1.5 million-year-old Antarctic climate data, and scientists find the first poisonous crustaceans.

ANTARCTICA

Certain regions of Antarctica could be storing climate data dating back to more than 1.5 million years, according to recently published Swiss and German scientists. Ice cores have small air bubbles and thus function as an “archive ” of the composition of the atmosphere of the time they were formed.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1OP-fKcjHc

ARGENTINA

Scientists at INTA and the University of Buenos Aires have created an edible film to coat meats, fruits and vegetables that prevents oxidation without altering their nutritional properties or appearance.

An NGO for children’s care and nutrition launched the “ten minutes per thousand days forever” in order to raise public awareness about the importance of health care and nutrition in the first thousand days of life. Anemia, chronic malnutrition and obesity affect 40% of children under five.

Argentine and British scientists digitally reconstructed the Argentinosaurus, one of the largest dinosaurs to ever have roamed. By laser scanning the skeleton and using computer models, the researchers determined that the dinosaurs walked at a speed of two meters per second, about 4.5 miles per hour.

CENTRAL AMERICA

In underground caverns in Mexico and elsewhere in Central America, the Natural History Museum of London found the first poisonous crustaceansSpeleonectes tulumensis is a species with a hypodermic needle-like appendages connected to glands that produce venom  composed of peptidases and neurotoxins.

GLOBAL

The FAO recently published a series of case studies wherein biotechnology has benefited small producers in developing countries. Among the most prominent are research to improve cassava in rural communities of Colombia, artificial insemination for breeding angora goats in Argentina and integrated systems that ferment byproducts of swine production in Brazil, among others.

Scientists around the world have analyzed drylands in 16 countries and concluded that increasing aridity is associated with reduced carbon and nitrogen in the soil and an increase in phosphorus. The results were published in the journal Nature.

MEXICO

A scientist from UNAM has successfully tested dopamine titanium implants in rats to alleviate Parkinson ‘s disease.