Comments Off on Brazil’s World Cup recycling program, a new lizard found in Peru, and solving Guatemala’s problem with agricultural pests.

13 March 2014

Brazil’s World Cup recycling program, a new lizard found in Peru, and solving Guatemala’s problem with agricultural pests.

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The Guatemalan government wants to solve its coffee fungus problem.

Brazil

Brazil wants to stand out as a recycler during the World Cup this June. The country plans on employing 840 recycling workers to clean stadiums and festivities.

A study of 2,927 Brazilian adults maps sedentary lifestyle to socioeconomic status. “Our study is one of the first to present a description of sedentary time in a middle-income setting,” the authors write. One conclusion: “Men, younger adults, those with higher schooling and from the wealthiest socioeconomic groups had higher overall sedentary scores.”

Bolivia

Bolivian scientists are studying ‘anti-cancer’ properties of a tree called the achachairú.

Guatemala

In recent years, Guatemala’s National Council of Science and Technology has been looking for solutions of importance to farmers such as pests affecting coffee, corn and cardamom.

Argentina

Scientists in Rosario, Argentina have already catalogued 80 species of fish inhabiting the Paraná River. Their research forms part of the “International Barcode of Life” project which aims to catalog all the animals, plants and fungi species by DNA barcoding and geographical location.

Two scientists at Argentina’s Maimonides University have successfully used stem cells isolated from the umbilical cord to regenerate bone and tissue in the treatment of cleft lip. They are now looking to expand the range of research by partnering with international institutions.

A sunken Spanish galleon from the eighteenth century which sank Jan. 10, 1765 has been found off the coast of Tierra del Fuego. Bullets and other important artifacts were found.

Peru

A new lizard (Potamites erythrocularis) has been found in Peru’s Cuzco region.

Chile

Chilean and French researchers have discovered on the island of Diego Almagro in Chilean Patagonia a series of 20 limestone caves complete with rock paintings. They believe the caves will provide clues about the separation of Earth’s continents.